Guzmania Houseplant Care – Tips For Growing Guzmania Bromeliads

scarlet-star-guzmania
Image by Cliff

By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener

Nothing beats the ease of bromeliad guzmania houseplant care. Growing guzmania bromeliads is simple and their unique growth habit and flower bracts will add interest to the home year round. Let’s learn more about the care of guzmanias.

Bromeliad Guzmania Plant

Guzmania plants are perennial plants in the bromeliad family. There are over 120 different guzmania plants and all are native to South America. These tropical beauties are known as epiphytic plants and attach to trees with roots that never reach the soil.

Striking bracts grow from the center of the plant and can be red, yellow, orange or deep purple depending on the species. Leaves are thin and dark green. They cause no injury to their host plant but just use them for support.

The leaves collect rainwater and the plant receives nourishment in its natural environment from decomposing leaves and droppings from monkeys and birds.

Growing Guzmania Bromeliads

The guzmania plant can also be grown in a container and is known as a prized houseplant in areas outside of its native region.

To pot a guzamina, put some small decorative stones or pieces of pottery in the bottom of a ceramic or terra cotta pot. The pot should be heavy, as the guzmania tends to be top heavy.

Place potting medium that is specifically designed for orchids on top of stones and plant your guzmania in the pot.

Care of Guzmanias

Guzmania houseplant care is easy, which adds to this plant’s popularity. Guzmanias require low light and should be kept out of direct sunlight.

Place distilled or filtered water in the central cup of the plant and replace frequently to keep it from rotting. Keep the potting mix moist during the spring and the summer months.

Guzmanias thrive in temperatures of at least 55 degrees F. or higher. Because these are tropical plants, they benefit from high humidity. A light mist daily will keep your guzmania looking its best.

Add a balanced fertilizer every two weeks during the spring and summer and a slow release fertilizer at the end of the summer.

This article was last updated on

Related Articles
Did you find this helpful?
Share it with your friends!
Additional Help & Information

Didn't find the answer to your question? Ask one of our friendly gardening experts.

Do you know anything about gardening? Help answer someone's gardening question.

Read more articles about Bromeliads.

Search for more information

Use the search box below to find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: