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Growing Oregano Inside Your House: How To Grow Oregano Indoors

By: Bonnie L. Grant

Oregano [1] (Origanum vulgare) is a heat-loving, pungent herb that is found in Mediterranean and Mexican cooking. Growing oregano indoors is an excellent way to bring those flavors to your food. If you are a dedicated cook, a display of fresh growing herbs near to hand enhances your dishes and enlivens recipes. Planting oregano indoors can be done alone or in a trough with other like-minded herbs.

Planting Oregano Indoors

Indoor oregano plants need similar conditions to exterior raised plants. The ideal temperatures for growing oregano inside are between 65 -70 F. (18-21 C.) in the day and 55-60 F. (13-16 C.) degrees at night.

The container should have excellent drainage. The oregano can be planted in equal parts potting soil [2], sand, peat moss [3] and perlite [4]. When you plant the oregano, make certain only the root ball is buried and the main stems are not immersed in soil or they may rot. Place your potted oregano in bright light.

Oregano can be moved outdoors in summer if you wish, but remember to bring it back in before temperatures change drastically or you may shock and kill it. Oregano grown in containers [5] will have a harder time surviving cold weather than oregano grown in the ground.

How to Grow Oregano Indoors

Oregano is an easy to care for plant that requires at least six to eight hours of sun. A bright southern exposure window is perfect or you can use a plant light [6]. Place the herbs no closer than 5 or 6 inches but no less than 15 inches away from an artificial light source.

Oregano needs to have the soil dry out a bit in between watering and benefits from frequent haircuts to keep the plant compact and producing leaves. Fertilize the oregano every two weeks with a diluted water soluble food every two weeks.

Herbs are so easy to care for that only a few items need to be remembered when learning how to grow oregano indoors.

Companion Herbs for Indoor Oregano

Growing oregano inside as a part of an herb display allows the cook to have a variety of fresh herbs available. The types of herbs planted with oregano should require the same culture and exposure. Bay [7], marjoram [8], sage [9] and thyme [10] have similar water and sun requirements and can be added to containers when growing oregano indoors.

Any herb that likes bright light, medium water and has a moderate growth rate would make a good companion plant for oregano growing indoors. Keep any of the herbs from flowering, which reduces the life of the plant.


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URL to article: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/oregano/growing-oregano-indoors.htm

URLs in this post:

[1] Oregano: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/oregano/learn-how-to-grow-oregano.htm

[2] potting soil: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/soilless-growing-mediums.htm

[3] peat moss: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/peat-moss-information.htm

[4] perlite: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/perlite-potting-soil.htm

[5] Oregano grown in containers: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/hgen/growing-herbs-in-containers.htm

[6] plant light: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/fluorescent-lighting-for-indoor-gardening.htm

[7] Bay: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/bay/sweet-bay-leaf-tree.htm

[8] marjoram: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/marjoram/marjoram-herbs-indoors.htm

[9] sage: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/sage/growing-sage-plant-indoors.htm

[10] thyme: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/thyme/growing-thyme-indoors.htm

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