Blushed Butter Oaks Care: Growing Blushed Butter Oaks Lettuce In The Garden

Blushed Butter Oaks Care: Growing Blushed Butter Oaks Lettuce In The Garden

By: Amy Grant

Want to put some pizzazz into your ho hum green salads? Try growing Blushed Butter Oaks lettuce plants. The lettuce ‘Blushed Butter Oaks’ is a hardy lettuce varietal that has great potential for year-round growing in some USDA zones.

About Blushed Butter Oaks Lettuce Plants

The lettuce varietal ‘Blushed Butter Oaks’ is a newer lettuce developed by Morton and introduced by Fedco in 1997.

It is one of the more cold hardy lettuces, and it stays crisp into hot weather longer than many other lettuces. It has pale green, pink blushed leaves that will add a nice touch of color to green salads. The crisp dense heart, reminiscent of oakleaf lettuce, combines nicely with a silky texture and buttery flavor associated with butter types of lettuce.

Growing Blushed Butter Oaks Lettuce

An open pollinated lettuce, seeds may be started inside in March and successively thereafter, or direct sown into the garden as soon as the ground can be worked and soil temperatures have warmed to at least 60 F. (16 C.).

As with other lettuce varieties, Blushed Butter Oaks lettuce prefers fertile, well-drained, moist soil.

Blushed Butter Oaks Care

Blushed Butter Oaks germinates in a week to two weeks, depending upon the soil temperature. Thin emergent seedlings to a distance of one inch (2.5 cm.) apart once they have grown their first set of true leaves.

Lettuces are heavy nitrogen feeders, so either incorporate plenty of organic compost into the soil prior to seeding, or plan on fertilizing mid-growing season.

Otherwise, Blushed Butter Oaks care is fairly simple. Keep the lettuce consistently moist but not sodden. If temperatures soar, consider covering the lettuce with shade cloth to keep it tender and sweet longer.

Keep an eye out for pests, such as slugs and snails, as well as disease, and keep the area around the lettuce free of weeds which can harbor both pests and disease.

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