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Misty Shell Pea Plants – Learn How To Grow Misty Peas In Gardens

Shell peas, or garden peas [1], are among some of the first vegetables that can be planted into the garden in the late winter and early spring. Though when to plant is dependent upon your USDA growing zone, vigorous disease resistant varieties such as ‘Misty’ will produce bountiful yields of sweet, tasty shell peas throughout the cool growing season.

Misty Shell Pea Info

‘Misty’ shell peas are an early producing variety of garden pea. Seldom reaching heights greater than 20 inches (51 cm.), plants produce large yields of 3-inch (7.5 cm.) pods. Reaching maturity in just under 60 days, this variety of garden pea is an excellent candidate for early season succession planting in the garden [2].

How to Grow Misty Shell Peas

Growing Misty peas is very similar to growing other varieties of pea. In most climates, it is best to direct sow the pea seeds outdoors as soon as the soil can be worked in the spring or about 4-6 weeks before the first predicted frost date.

Seeds will germinate best when soil temperatures are still cool, around 45 F. (7 C.). Plant seeds about one inch (2.5 cm.) deep into well amended garden soil.

Though temperatures may still be cool and there may still be a chance of snow and frost in the garden, growers need not worry. As with other types of pea, Misty pea plants should be able to withstand and demonstrate tolerance to these harsh conditions. While growth may initially be somewhat slow, development of flowers and pods will begin to occur as springtime warmth arrives.

Peas should always be planted in well-draining soil. The combination of cool temperatures and waterlogged soil may cause seeds to rot before they are able to germinate. Carefully weed the area, as pea roots do not like to be disturbed.

Since Misty pea plants are nitrogen fixing legumes [3], avoid using fertilizers high in nitrogen, as this may negatively impact flowering and pod production.

While some taller varieties may require the use of staking, it is unlikely that it will be required with this shorter type. However, gardeners who experience adverse weather conditions may find it necessary.


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URL to article: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/peas/misty-shell-pea-plants.htm

URLs in this post:

[1] garden peas: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/peas/how-grow-peas.htm

[2] succession planting in the garden: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/succession-planting-garden.htm

[3] nitrogen fixing legumes: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/nitrogen-nodules-and-nitrogen-fixing-plants.htm

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