Care Of Romulea Plants – How To Grow A Romulea Iris

Care Of Romulea Plants – How To Grow A Romulea Iris

By: Tonya Barnett, (Author of FRESHCUTKY)
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For many gardeners, one of the most rewarding aspects of growing flowers is the process of seeking out more rare and interesting plant varieties. Although more common flowers are just as beautiful, growers who wish to establish impressive plant collections delight in the growth of more unique, difficult-to-find bulbs and perennials. Romulea, for example, can be a highly prized addition to spring and summer flowering gardens.

Romulea Iris Info

Romulea flowers are members of the Iris (Iridaceae) family. And although they may be members of the family and commonly referred to as an iris, the flowers of Romulea plants resemble that of crocus blooms.

Coming in a wide range of colors, these small flowers bloom very low to the ground. Due to their bloom habit, Romulea flowers look beautiful when planted together in large masses.

How to Grow a Romulea Iris

Like many lesser known flowers, locating Romulea plants may be very difficult at local plant nurseries and online. Luckily for its growers, many types of Romulea are easy to start from seed.

First and foremost, you will need to do some preliminary research regarding the type of Romulea you’re wishing to grow. While some types are not able to withstand the cold, other varieties thrive as fall and winter grown species.

When growing Romuleas, seed should be planted in starting trays of soilless seed starting mix. While most types will germinate within several weeks, the germination rate may increase if growers are able to fluctuate between periods of warmer and cooler temperatures. In general, germination should take no longer than about 6 weeks.

Growing Romuleas is a relatively easy process, but they do require some special care. Like many spring blooming flowers, Romulea plants will require a dry period of dormancy in the summer. This will allow plants to prepare for the upcoming winter and store needed energy for the next season’s bloom period.

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