Coffee Plant Care – Growing Coffee Plants Indoors

coffee-plant
Image by Chris Phan

By Heather Rhoades

Did you know that the same plant that grows coffee beans also makes a great houseplant? Considered to be among the easiest and hardiest of houseplants, coffee plant is great for both experienced or beginner gardeners. Not only is coffee plant care easy, but the plant itself is lovely and makes a wonderful addition to the home.

How to Grow Coffee Plant

Coffee plants prefer bright, but indirect, light. This means that they should be placed near a window but not directly in the window itself. They also cannot take temperatures below freezing and will not do well in temperatures that stay consistently below 65 degrees F. Because of this, you should keep them away from drafts in the winter.

When growing coffee plants, the soil needs to stay moist, but not soaking wet. Also, make sure that both the soil and the pot that your coffee plant is growing in has good drainage. The humidity around the plant will need to stay high as well. Setting your coffee plant on a water filled pebble tray will help with humidity. Like many houseplants, a coffee plant will need less water in the winter than in the summer.

Your coffee plant care routine can also include light fertilizing with a balanced fertilizer once every 2-3 months in the spring and summer. Keep in mind that a happy coffee plant can grow up to six feet tall. Therefore, you will either need to be able to provide enough space for the plant or make pruning a regular part of caring for your coffee plant. If you choose to prune your coffee plant, the best time to prune it is early spring.

Many people wonder if they will actually be able to harvest coffee beans when growing coffee plants. If the coffee plant is grown in ideal conditions indoors, it will eventually flower when it matures, which can take 3-5 years. Even in the best of conditions, however, you can only expect a few flowers to form, but, if you hand pollinate them, they will produce the berries that contain coffee beans. You may not get enough to brew a whole pot of coffee, but you may get enough to give roasting a few coffee beans a fun try.

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